Thursday, 24 April 2014

Recipes from a Baronial Investiture - Part 1 - by Lady Angharad


Recipes from a Baronial Investiture - Part 1


By Lady Angharad Gam, Barony of Innilgard, A.S. XLVIII

These recipes are for dishes presented as part of the Innilgard Baronial Investiture. This feast was held on April 5th A.S. XLVIII. There was no particular theme to the feast. The menu was built around dishes some people had volunteered to cook prior to myself coming on board as head cook. Not all the dishes presented at the feast have recipes listed. There was a green sallat and a platter of antipasti served as part of the first remove, roasted carrots in the second remove and an apple pie in the third remove. Recipes are not given for these. Otherwise recipes are presented roughly in order of service.




Chicken Pasties
Recipe XXX. Quomodo condiatur pullus in pastello. Man skal et unct høns i tu skæræ oc swepæ thær um helæ salviæ blath, oc skær i spæk oc salt, oc hyli thæt hø mæth degh; oc latæ bakæ i en hogn swa sum brøth. Swa mughæ man gøræ allæ handæ fiskæ pastel, oc fughlæ oc annæt køt.
Recipe XXX. How to prepare a chicken pasty. One should cut a young chicken in two and cover it with whole leaves of sage, and add diced bacon and salt. And wrap this chicken with dough and bake it in an oven like bread. In the same way one can make all kinds of pasties: of fish, of fowl, and of other meats.
Libellus de Arte Coquinaria

I wanted to make these pasties fairly small, so I chose to use chicken mince to avoid a lot of chopping. If you are making larger pasties you might choose breast or thigh fillet and dice it.

2.5 kg chicken mince
400 gms short cut bacon
1 large bunch fresh sage
13 sheets shortcrust pastry

Dice the bacon as finely as you can. Pick the leaves off the sage and chop these finely also. Mix together with the chicken mince. Cut each sheet of pastry into eight pieces. Put a largish half dessertspoonful of filling on each piece and seal carefully (you may need to wet the edge of the pastry). Make a small slit in the top of each pasty. Place on a baking tray that has been oiled or lined with baking paper. Bake at 180°C for 15-20mins, or until the crust is nicely browned.

Makes 104 pasties

Urchins or Hedgehogges

Take the mawe of the grete swine, and fyfe other sex of pigges mawes, fyll hem full of the self fars & sowe hem fast. Perboile hem; take hem up, & make smale prikkes of gode past, and frye hem. Take these prickes yfryed & se hem thiche in the mawes on the fars, made after an urchoun without legges. Put hem on a spyt and roost hem, and colour hem with safroun, and messe hem forth.
Farsur to make pomme dorryse and othere thynges. Takes the lire of pork rawe, and grynde it smale. Medle it up with eyren & powder fort, safroun and salt; and do therto raisouns of coraunce.
Forme of Curye

900gms minced pork
2 eggs beaten
1 tsp salt
2 tsp each ginger, pepper
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp cloves
(opt 1/2 cup (about 90gms) currants)
55gms slivered almonds

Mix together all ingredients except the almonds, reserving a few currants. Form the mixture into small meatballs, about the size of a fifty cent piece, giving them a slightly oval shape. Insert slivered almonds into the meatballs to simulate the spines of hedgehogs. Use currants for eyes. Bake at 180°C for about 20 mins.

Makes about 20 hedgehogs

Darioles

Take creme of cowe mylke, other of almaundes; do therto ayren with sugur, safroun and salt. Medle it yfere. Do it in a coffyn of ii ynche depe; bake it wel and serue it forth.
Forme of Curye

This is the ultimate custard tart recipe. It is very good.

5 egg yolks
500mls cream (2 cups)
80gms sugar
2 sheets shortcrust pastry

Beat the egg yolks with the sugar then mix in the cream. Pour into pastry cases and bake at about 140C until just set. If you want to make it yellow, heat the cream gently with the saffron in, and allow it to sit and infuse for 30 mins or so before you add the egg yolks and sugar.
If you want to make the almond milk version simply draw up a very thick almond milk, and use the same amount as you would have of cream. Note that this is not completely suitable for Lent because it still uses eggs, but it may have sufficed for less strict fasting periods, or simply have been intended for those who like almonds at any time.

This is enough for 16 individual tarts or two in the usual feast foil pie tins.

Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Historical Food Fortnightly Challenge



Here is a challenge that some of our members may be interested in......


From: http://historicalfoodfortnightly.blogspot.com.au/p/about-historical-food-fortnightly.html

The Historical Food Fortnightly takes its inspiration from the Historical Sew Fortnightly, the brainchild of Leimomi at The Dreamstress (who has graciously given us her blessing for this spin-off). It is a challenge series for those interested in historical foodways, or the study of how food, culture, and traditions have intersected throughout human history.

This isn’t your average cooking challenge! Anyone can make “old timey” food based on a notion of what was eaten throughout history. In this challenge, we’re asking you to make things as close as possible to how they are made in the past. We’re asking you to research and document each recipe with primary sources - that is, sources that come from the actual time-period you are interpreting - while utilizing secondary sources as a backup to primary sources. Secondary sources are alright as a reference, but should be backed up with primary sources. We’re turning our own notions of cooking on their heads to discover how food was cooked and what sort of sensory experience (sight, taste, sound, smell, touch) our ancestors had in consuming it.

Why do something so crazy? By cooking things as they cooked them, with the ingredients they used, and consuming food as close as possible to what they consumed, we can better understand the past. It’s a bit of experiential archaeology to view history through the medium of food. It’s also a really delicious time travel experience! And best of all, we’ll be doing it together and learning from each others’ experiences.

How Does It Work?

Every fortnight from June 1, 2014 to May 31, 2015 we will feature a themed challenge. Your mission is to take each challenge and cook, bake, or otherwise prepare a food item or dish from a historic recipe the way it was meant to be prepared and consumed.

Your creations can be as elaborate or simple as you like, and can definitely be chosen to suit your skills and interests. You can choose to participate in as many challenges as you like - you can pick and choose the challenges that interest you, and you can choose the ones that work in your schedule. The most popular ways to participate are to do a marathon (completing all the challenges, for the craziest/most masochistic among us) or a half-marathon (doing every other challenge). How you participate is up to you and your comfort level, though we hope that everyone will choose to step outside the box and stretch themselves.

The emphasis here is on research and documentation, and the goal is to learn more about historic cooking through experience and trial. We believe that a better understanding of the past comes from doing things with an eye towards authenticity and accuracy, and from good, solid research about how things were done and why. We encourage everyone to research each recipe and to document their research so that we all can learn from each other.

Our definition of “historic” is anything before 1960, so your recipes should be documented to a date before then. Other than that, it is wide open to anything for which you can find documentation. You also need not limit yourself to one era - feel free to hop around as much as you like.

There are three steps for joining us on this adventure.
  • Follow our blog! We’ll be posting the challenges, writing about our own creations, plus highlighting the adventures of other participants.
  • Post your name, and a link to your blog in the comments of this post. We’ll include you in the list of participants so others can follow your adventures through the challenges! Whenever you blog about your challenges, we’ll see it!
  • Join the Facebook group - this isn’t strictly necessary, but it can be a fun way to get connected with other participants, post your challenges, and see what everyone is concocting!

************************************************************************************************

If any LCG members do decide to participate and blog their results, please email the Administrator with details so that your adventures can also be posted here to inspire other members.

Tuesday, 25 March 2014

Updated List of Master and Mistress Cooks



A list of those good gentles who have attained Mastery within the Lochac Cooks' Guild:

* Adeline de Montfort - Rowany
* Antonia Ambrosia Illirica - Mordenvale
* Branwen of Werchesvorde - Abertridwr
* Fillipa Ginevra Francesca di Lucignano - Rowany
* Gilli feilan - Cairn Fell
* Gwir verch Madog - Krae Glas
* Isabeau of the Wylde Wood - Rowany
* Jean le Renaud de Pyranees - Dismal Fogs
* Joan Sutton - Politarchopolis
* Kara of Kirriemuir - Bacchus Wood
* Nicolette Duffay - Stormhold
* Rhiceneth Rhieinfellt uerch Rhieinwylydd Rhybrawst uerch Rhydderch Rhuddfedel Rhydern -Burnfield
* Thomasina Freeborn - Bordescros


To become a Master or Mistress Cook within the Guild, a journeyman must be the Head Cook / Feast Steward for an official SCA event, organise a period menu for one feast, and personally cook at least two dishes thereof. There must be complete documentation provided for each dish served at the event and the presentation and taste of the two personally cooked dishes are to be commented upon by three attendees at the event via recipe submission paperwork. The cook must also write one article for publication in a Kingdom newsletter or magazine (i.e. Pegasus, Tournaments Illustrated or Cockatrice) OR teach on the topic of period cooking at an official SCA event and send a report, including all notes, handouts & documentation to the Guild Administrator.

Having completed the requirements, each rise in rank becomes valid upon written notification from the Guild Administrator.

New LCG Master

It is with great pleasure that I announce that Lord Gilli feilan is the newest LCG member to attain the rank of Master Cook. Congratulations Lord Gilli!

Rank of Master or Mistress Cook within the LCG

To become a Master or Mistress Cook within the Guild, a journeyman must be the Head Cook / Feast Steward for an official SCA event, organise a period menu for one feast, and personally cook at least two dishes thereof. There must be complete documentation provided for each dish served at the event and the presentation and taste of the two personally cooked dishes are to be commented upon by three attendees at the event via recipe submission paperwork. The cook must also write one article for publication in a Kingdom newsletter or magazine (i.e. Pegasus, Tournaments Illustrated or Cockatrice) OR teach on the topic of period cooking at an official SCA event and send a report, including all notes, handouts & documentation to the Guild Administrator.

Having completed the requirements, each rise in rank becomes valid upon written notification from the Guild Administrator.


A list of those good gentles who have attained Mastery within the Lochac Cooks' Guild:

* Adeline de Montfort - Rowany
* Antonia Ambrosia Illirica - Mordenvale
* Branwen of Werchesvorde - Abertridwr
* Fillipa Ginevra Francesca di Lucignano - Rowany
* Gwir verch Madog - Krae Glas
* Isabeau of the Wylde Wood - Rowany
* Jean le Renaud de Pyranees - Dismal Fogs
* Joan Sutton - Politarchopolis
* Kara of Kirriemuir - Bacchus Wood
* Nicolette Duffay - Stormhold
* Rhiceneth Rhieinfellt uerch Rhieinwylydd Rhybrawst uerch Rhydderch Rhuddfedel Rhydern -Burnfield
* Thomasina Freeborn - Bordescros




Sunday, 2 March 2014

Haedus in Alio Recipe

I would like to introduce Lady Angharad, one of Innilgard's very talented cooks. Here is her Haedus in Alio recipe:


Haedus in Alio Recipe 


“Take a quarter of kid and dress well for roasting, lard and fill with a generous amount of peeled cloves of garlic, the same way you would as if you wished to baste or lard it. Then take some good verjuice, two egg yolks, two crushed garlic cloves, a little saffron and pepper, and a bit of fatty broth, and mix all these things together and put this mixture in a pot beneath the kid while it is roasting, and baste it every so often with this sauce. When it is done cooking put the kid on a platter, top with the sauce, and a bit of chopped parsley. The kid should be well done and served very hot.”
Libro de arte coquinaria, Maestro Martino da Como

“Grease a kid or a quarter of one with lard and cleaned garlic cloves; put it on a spit and turn it by the fire. Baste it often with sprigs of bay or rosemary and the sauce I shall now describe. Take verjuice and the juice of the meat, the yolks of two eggs well beaten, two cloves of garlic well pounded, a pinch of saffron and a little pepper, and mix this and pour into a dish. With this (as I said) you baste what you are cooking. When it is done put it in a dish and pour some of the sauce over it and sprinkle with finely chopped parsley. Caeculus should not eat this because it dulls the eyesight and arouses dormant passions.”
De Honesta Voluptate, Platina

Platina, who normally shamelessly plagiarises Maestro Martino, makes a useful addition here – the rosemary, and following his tradition I introduce a little more. You will die for this, and people will mob the kitchen demanding more.

You can try this recipe with kid if you can get some, but lamb has a lot more flavour. If you want to ‘lard’ your leg with garlic as Martino suggests, stab small, deep holes all over with a sharp knife and stuff whole or halved cloves of garlic in them. You can do this in addition to or instead of the treatment described below, and it is particularly effective if you have a larger piece of lamb.

1 leg of lamb (up to 2kg)
4 cloves of garlic, peeled
3 sprigs of fresh rosemary
2 egg yolks
½ cup verjuice
olive oil
pinch saffron
salt, pepper
fresh parsley

Put two of the garlic cloves into a mortar along with the leaves from two of the sprigs of rosemary, and some coarse salt. Note that you can remove the leaves from a rosemary branch very quickly by holding it a couple of cm below the tip and pulling your fingers along stem towards the cut end. Grind all these things up as finely as you can, and moisten into a sludge with olive oil.

Take the leg of lamb. If it is very fatty cut off some of the fat, slicing it off right down to the flesh in some places. With a narrow, sharp knife make a hole alongside the bone, passing the whole length of the leg. Stuff the mixture from the mortar in the hole. Take the green and garlicky juices from the mortar adding a little more olive oil if necessary, and smear over the outside of the leg.

Put the leg into a covered roasting dish, preferably one with a nice heavy base. If you don’t have a covered roasting dish, wrap the leg in foil. Put in the oven at 200C (180C fan forced). Roast it for 20 mins for every 0.5kg plus an extra 20 mins (this is for well-done).

Smash up the remaining two cloves of garlic and put them in a small saucepan with the other ingredients except for the parsley and the remaining rosemary. Mix up well. Every half an hour throughout the cooking process take the lamb out the oven. Tip the juices that have come out into the saucepan, and turn the lamb over. Mix the sauce and baste the lamb with it using the remaining rosemary sprig. Return to the oven.
When the lamb is done remove it from the oven and tip any remaining juices into the sauce. Let the lamb rest for a little while, then carve it into small pieces and put it on a platter. Put the saucepan with the sauce on the stove and heat until it is hot but not boiling. If you like you can add some breadcrumbs (or rice flour) to thicken it up a bit. If it seems a bit scanty add some good quality beef stock. Pour over the lamb, sprinkle with chopped fresh parsley, and resist the urge to secrete yourself in a cupboard and eat it all.

Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Cooks Corner by Alianore de Essewell (February)

Cooks Corner – February        by    Alianore de Essewell



Hi all and welcome to the first recipe for this year, it’s a relatively easy one and was sourced from this web site
It contains many cookbooks from different periods and countries, some not translated into English.

I chose the Portuguese flag and followed the links, which turned out to be to an SCA resources page, a translation by Baroness Faerisa Gwynarden.
and then followed her link to the original site.

Guild Category:                      11. Preserves -- Jams, Jellies, Pickles, Salted & Dried Items
Redact as you like

Original web source

Um tratado da cozinha portuguesa do século XV
[Coleção de receitas, algumas bastante originais, para o preparo das mais variadas iguarias]
A treatise of the fifteenth century Portuguese cuisine
[Collection of recipes, some rather unique, for the preparation of various delicacies]
Pessegada
Cortem ao meio duas partes de pêssego e uma de marmelo, e levem-nas a cozer, em separado. Depois que estiverem cozidas, passem tudo por uma peneira fina. A seguir, ajuntem tanto  açúcar quanto for o peso da massa, e levem o tacho ao fogobrando.
Deixem atingir o ponto  de marmelada, e coloquem o doce em caixetas.

Google translation
Peach Marmelade

Cut in half two pieces of peach and quince, and bring them to bake separately. After they are cooked, pass it through a fine sieve. Then let them gather as much sugar as is the weight of the dough, and bring the pot to a simmer.

Let the system reaches a jam, and put candy in Caixetas.  [unsure of this word, does not translate but may mean container.]

Ingredients:
Peach
Quince
Sugar

Cut up peaches and quinces and cook separately
Once cooked, pass through a fine sieve
Combine and add as much sugar as there is weight of paste
Bring to simmer

On first read I would assume this to be a type of Jam [Marmalade], however on doing further research using the terms [Medieval] [Portugal] [quince]…..
[I was actually looking for a medieval image of a quince to add to the recipe] but instead I learned that Marmalade can also refer to ‘paste candies’ pressed on molds or put in boxes or trays and cut into pieces.

Check out this site for some interesting information on the subject


Though later in period and English check out the below recipe too.

John Murrel's 'Paste of Genoa', a delicious paste made from a mixture of quinces and peaches,
 A Daily Exercise for Ladies and Gentlewomen, (London: 1617)











Caixetas seems to translate into ‘box’ and may actually refer to this type of box or even a mold
   



Pictures from historicfood.com